loma&Ll Cdv&oru r ap&tA

A SELECTIVE MICROFILM EDITION

PART III (1887-1898)

Thomas E. Jeffrey Microfilm Editor

Gregory Field Theresa M. Collins David W. Hutchings Lisa Gitclman Leonard DeGraaf Dennis D. Madden

Reese V. Jenkins Director and Editor

Mary Ann Hellrlgel Paul B. Israel Robert A. Rosenberg Karen A. Detig Gregory Jankunls Douglas G. Tarr

Sponsors

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey National Park Service, Edison National Historic Site New Jersey Historical Commission Smithsonian Institution

University Publications of America Bethesda, Maryland 1993

THOMAS A. EDISON PAPERS

Reese V. Jenkins Director and Editor

Thomas E. Jeffrey- Associate Director and Microfilm Editor

Robert A. Rosenberg Managing Editor, Book Edition

Helen Endlck

Assistant Director for Administration

Associate Editor

Paul B. Israel

Research Associates Theresa M. Collins David W. Hutchings Karen A. Detig

Assistant Editors Keith A. Nicr Gregory Field Lisa Gltelman Martha J. King

Secretary

Grace Kurkowskl

Intern Student Assistant

Gregory Jankunls Bethany Jankunls

BOARD OF SPONSORS

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Francis L. Lawrence Joseph J. Seneca Richard F. Foley Rudolph M. Bell

New Jersey Historical Commission Howard L. Green

National Park Service John Maounis Maryanne Gerbauckas Nancy Waters George Tselos Smithsonian Institution Bernard Finn Arthur P. Molella

EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD

James Brittain, Georgia Institute of Technology Alfred D. Chandler, Jr., Harvard University Neil Harris, University of Chicago Thomas Parke Hughes, University of Pennsylvania Arthur Link, Princeton University Nathan Reingold, Smithsonian Institution Robert E. Schofield, Iowa State University

CORPORATE ASSOCIATES

William C. Hittinger (Chairman), RCA Corporation Edward J. Bloustein, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey Cees Bruynes, North American Philips Corporation Paul J. Christiansen, Charles Edison Fund Philip F. Dietz, Westinghouse Electric Corporation Roland W. Schmitt, General Electric Corporation Harold W. Sonn, Public Service Electric and Gas Company Morris Tanenbaum, AT&T

FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTORS

PRIVATE FOUNDATIONS

PUBLIC FOUNDATIONS

The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

National Science Foundation

Charles Edison Fund

National Endowment for the Humanities

The Hyde and Watson Foundation

National Historical Publications and

Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation

Records Commission

PRIVATE CORPORATIONS AND INDIVIDUALS

Alabama Power Company

(;

Amerada Hess Corporation

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley H. Katz

Anonymous

Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.

AT&T

McGraw-Edison Company

Atlantic Electric

Minnesota Power

Association of Edison Illuminating

New Jersey Bell

Companies, Inc.

New York State Electric & Gas

Battelle Memorial Institute

Corporation t

The Boston Edison Foundation

North American Philips Corporation

Cabot Corporation Foundation, Inc.

Philadelphia Electric Company

Carolina Power & Light Company

Philips International B.V.

Consolidated Edison Company of

Public Service Electric and Gas

New York, Inc.

Company ;!

Consumers Power Company

RCA Corporation

Coming Glass Works Foundation

Robert Bosch GmbH

Duke Power Company

Rochester Gas and Electric j .

Entergy Corporation (Middle South

Corporation i

Electric Systems)

San Diego Gas & Electric

Exxon Corporation

Savannah Electric and Power Company

Florida Power & Light Company

Schering-Plough Foundation

General Electric Foundation

Texas Utilities Company 1

Gould Inc. Foundation

Thomas & Betts Corporation

Gulf States Utilities Company

Thomson Grand Public } ;;

Idaho Power Company

Transamerica Delaval Inc. | j

A Note on the Sources

The pages which have been filmed are the best copies available. Every technical effort possible has been made to ensure legibility.

PUBLICATION AND MICROFILM COPYING RESTRICTIONS

Reel duplication of the whole or of any part of this film is prohibited. In lieu of transcripts, however, enlarged photocopies of selected items contained on these reels may be made in order to facilitate research.

NEW JERSEY AND PENNSYLVANIA CONCENTRATING WORKS RECORDS

The New Jersey and Pennsylvania Concentrating Works (NJPCW) was the largest and most expensive of Edison’s iron ore ventures. Organized on December 27, 1888, the company began operations in January 1889. Its general offices were initially located in New York City and were moved to the West Orange laboratory in 1894. Edison supplied more than four-fifths of the company’s capital and served as its president from 1889 until 1908. Numerous associates, including Charles Batchelor, Samuel Insull, Walter S. Mallory, and John F. Randolph, also served as officers. In the early 1890s the company constructed a plant at Ogden (later named Edison), near present-day Ogdensburg, New Jersey, to engage in the large-scale separation of magnetic iron ore from low-grade ore found in abundance throughout the region. Despite Edison’s constant attention, the Ogden works never ran satisfactorily. Equipment failures, along with engineering and other technical problems, prompted Edison to develop costly new machines for crushing, conveying, screening, separating, and drying the iron ore. By the end of the 1890s, iron ore prices had fallen sharply with the arrival of low-cost, high-grade ore from the Mesabi range in Minnesota, and NJPCW found itself unable to sell its product at a profit, despite significantly lowering the unit cost of its separated ore. Operations were shut down permanently in 1900, despite Edison’s promise to rebuild the works. The technology, including the crushing machinery, was later used at other enterprises, including the Edison Portland Cement Co. at Stewartsville, New Jersey, and the New Jersey Zinc Co. of Franklin, New Jersey.

The records are arranged into nine series: (1) Administrative and Financial Records; (2) Shipping Records [not filmed]; (3) Employee Records [not filmed]; (4) Legal Records; (5) Plant Operations Records; (6) Minutes; (7) Letterbooks; (8) Mine Survey and Property Records [not filmed]; and (9) Sand Sales Records. A finding aid is available at the Edison National Historic Site. Related records can be found in the Alexander Elliott, Jr., Papers and the Walter S. Mallory Papers (Special Collections Series)

Administrative and Financial Records. These records cover the period 1889-1911, but most of the documents were generated in the 1890s. Included are incoming correspondence, accounting records, labor statements, stock certificates, canceled checks, and other general office records kept by company officers or senior managers. The records document the organization,

management, and failure of the company; the experimental mill at Bechtelsville, Pennsylvania; operations at Ogden, New Jersey; and the testing of equipment, ore, and briquettes. Other subjects include relationships with suppliers, customers, and investors and the market for Edison’s ore, briquettes, and milling technologies. Some of the correspondence is duplicated in the Letterbooks, and some of the material is complemented by documents in other series.

Shipping Records [not filmed]. These records cover the period 1889- 1901. Included are bills of lading, invoices, orders, receipts, requisitions, and other documents relating to company purchases and sales. There is also some correspondence, but most of the correspondence relating to shipping can be found in the Administrative and Financial Records.

Employee Records [not filmed]. These records cover the period 1889- 1900. Included are payroll lists, daily time sheets, time cards, and other employee records. The documents provide information about the various occupations at the Ogden works, hours worked, and monthly earnings payments. Some of the records identify laborers by ethnicity, particularly Italian and Hungarian.

Legal Records. These records cover the period 1814-1911, but most of the documents were generated in the 1890s; the earliest material consists of title searches. Included are correspondence, agreements, deeds, lists, leases, indentures, opinions, and reports. The documents deal primarily with leases, mineral rights, and mining surveys on mining sites in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Some items relate to company board matters, stock transactions, tax matters, financial claims, and the acquisition of the Sussex Iron Co. Other material pertains to litigation resulting from the collapse of the stock house at the Ogden works in 1892, including reports by detectives hired on behalf of the company to infiltrate the mining community.

Plant Operations Records. These records cover the period 1891-1902. Included are correspondence, memoranda, reports, notes, drawings, calculations, lists, and other documents. Most of the material deals with the design, construction, operation, improvement, repair, and dismantling of machinery and equipment at the Ogden works. The records are arranged into five groups: (1) unbound documents; (2) linen drawings; (3) bound volumes; (4) standard-size notebooks; and (5) pocket notebooks.

Minutes. These records cover the period 1888-1900. In addition to the company minute book, there are unbound duplicate minutes of directors’ meetings for 1891 and 1892 and miscellaneous related items for 1896. Only the minute book (December 1888-January 1900) has been filmed. The subjects covered include the election and resignation of officers, the appointment of general managers, calls for capital, and increases in capital stock. Specific discussions involve mine properties known as the Gilbert Ore Mine, Scrub Oak Mine, and Ogden Mine; negotiations regarding the royalty agreement with the Edison Ore Milling Co., Ltd. (1890); the purchase of the Ogden Mining Co. (1891); the death of Robert L. Cutting, Jr. (1894); and the removal of the company’s offices from New York City to the West Orange laboratory (1894). Also included are two long reports by Edison on the status of the company’s mills (1890, 1898).

Letterbooks. These records, which cover the period 1889-1903, consist of 52 volumes containing tissue copies of the company’s outgoing correspondence and internal communications. Some of the material is duplicated in, or is complemented by, material in other series. The letterbooks are divided into 7 subgroups determined by the principal author(s) of the volumes, the specific subject matter, and considerations of chronological continuity. Included are letters relating to stock transactions; stockholders’ and directors’ meetings; payment of company obligations; changes in company officers; insurance, employment, tax, and legal matters; press relations; market and economic conditions; properties leased or owned; the design and purchase of equipment; the chemical analysis, manufacture, and marketing of iron ore, briquettes, and sand; the construction, modification, and closing of the Ogden works; interest in minerals other than iron, such as gold and molybdenite; and visitors to the Ogden works. There are also some letters regarding Edison’s views on company policies and correspondence about his schedule, character, health, and family.

In addition, the letterbooks contain occasional correspondence regarding Edison’s other iron ore enterprises; some letters concerning phonograph contracts, litigation, and stock; items pertaining to the price of General Electric securities and other aspects of the electric light business; and a few letters about the telephone, kinetoscope, and phonoplex business.

Mine Survey and Property Records [not filmed] . These records cover the period 1889-1897. They consist of approximately 75 standard-size (6" x 9") and pocket notebooks. The books were used primarily by Theodore Lehmann,

Charles J. Reed, and Charles H. Kayser for surveys of mining properties. Most of the surveys relate to the Ogden mine and other properties in New Jersey, but there are also surveys of properties in Pennsylvania and New York. One notebook contains an 1897 list of property leases.

Sand Sales Records. These records cover the period 1891-1902, and deal primarily with routine business matters, although they sometimes discuss the use of Edison sand for cement, traction, sand blasting, and other purposes. Only one item has been filmed: a bound volume containing an abstract of sand and ore concentrate sales for the period 1892-1902.

NEW JERSEY AND PENNSYLVANIA CONCENTRATING WORKS ADMINISTRATIVE AND FINANCIAL RECORDS

These records cover the period 1889-1911, but most of the documents were generated in the 1890s. Included are incoming correspondence, accounting records, labor statements, stock certificates, cancelled checks, and other general office records kept by company officers or senior managers. The records document the organization, management, and failure of the company; he experimental mill at Bechtelsville, Pennsylvania; operations at Ogden, New Jersey; and the testing of equipment, ore, and briquettes. Other subjects include relationships with suppliers, customers, and investors and the market tor Edison s ore, briquettes, and milling technologies.

i N°Da?f ?°rr^,p0ndents rePresenting the company include: Edison, Charles Batchelor Thomas Butler, Joseph Hutchinson, Samuel Insull, Harry n ef S‘ Malloi7’ William S. Periy, John F. Randolph, and Alfred

O. late. Other prominent correspondents include: Alexander Backus, Henrv C. Demming. James C. Parrish, Pilling & Crane, Robert H. Richards, Frank S' w?SoC LlTgston Rogers> James B- Tonkling, Joseph Wharton, John H. Wood. Some of the correspondence is duplicated in the New Jersey and Pennsylvania Concentrating Works Letterbooks, and some of the material is complemented by documents in other series in this record group.

The following categories of documents have been filmed: documents reflecting Edison s direct intervention in and supervision of company matters, Edison s view on company policies, Edison’s involvement in experimentation and aspects of Edison’s character, health, schedule, or family; overviews’ summaries, reports, and general descriptions of mill operations and technologies, company finances, and marketing strategies; descriptions of company products, such as iron ore briquettes and sand.

The following categories of documents have not been filmed: capital calls; meeting announcements; stock certificates; trial balance statements; petty cash statements; statements of accounts payable; cancelled checks and check books; lists of bills; bound ledgers, day books, and cash books; other routine financial documents, such as stamp accounts; labor statements; routine statements relating to payment of taxes; stationeiy and blank forms; letters of transmittal; and routine correspondence with vendors and customers.

Correspondence (1889)

This folder contains correspondence relating to ore mining and milling operations at Bechtelsville Pennsylvania, and Ogden, New Jersey. Most of the letters are to and from Edison and Harry M. Livor, general manager. The letters deal mainly with equipment, ore analyses, and mining properties. Some items concern the steam plant, separator, and crushing rolls. A few items pertain to the purchase of an expansion engine from Weyher & Richemond of France.

Correspondence (1890)

This folder contains correspondence relating to ore mining and milling operations at Bechtelsville Pennsylvania, and Ogden, New Jersey. Most of the letters are to and from Edison and Hany M. Livor, general manager. The letters deal mainly with equipment, mill capacity, and mining properties. Some items concern the steam plant, dust separator, belt machines with automatic feed, and ore diying.

Correspondence (1891)

This folder contains documents, primarily correspondence, dealing mainly with mining and milling operations Jcrsey- 1116 PrinciPaI correspondents are Edison; Harry M. Livor, general manager until June 1891; P. F. Gildea, superintendent at the Bechtelsville, Pennsylvania plant and employed at other properties until June 1891; and William S. Periy, treasurer of the company. Some of the letters deal with the problem of ore m the taihngs. Other items concern personnel changes and the company’s relations with its major ore purchasers, including the Bethlehem Iron Co. and Pennsylvania Steel Co.

Correspondence (1892)

This folder contains documents, primarily correspondence, relating to milling operations at Ogden, New Jersey. Most of the letters are to or from Edison; Owen J. Conley, superintendent; William S. Periy, treasurer and Charles Batchelor. Included are letters pertaining to diying and bricking technologies and to the market value of molybdenite. Also included is a letter from Peny to Robert L. Cutting, Jr., describing progress at the mill.

Correspondence (1893)

This folder contains documents, primarily correspondence, relating to the analysis of ore briquettes produced by the Edison process at Ogden, New Jersey. Many of the letters are to and from Pilling & Crane, the Philadelphia firm to whom numerous eastern iron companies reported their impressions of the briquettes.

Correspondence (1894)

This folder contains correspondence and other documents relating to the analysis of ore briquettes, construction of the bricker, and the market for Edison’s ore. Some items concern activities at the mill including the acquisition of a dynamo and management techniques. Other items pertain to tax matters. Most of the correspondence is between Edison and the Philadelphia firm, Pilling & Crane.

Correspondence (1895)

This folder contains documents, primarily correspondence, relating to activities at the Ogden works. Most of the letters are to or from Walter S. Mallory, vice president, and Edison. Some of the letters concern experiments with grease cups, tests of the elevator, and work in the machine shop. Other letters discuss Joseph Wharton s interest in hematite and his order of Edison’s ore. Also included are an undated typescript entitled The Present Situation of Mr. Edison’s Undertaking is as Follows"; and a letter from Edison to James C. Parrish, presented as an example of the letters sent to prospective investors in an attempt to finance additional bricker ovens.

Correspondence (1896)

This folder contains documents, primarily correspondence, relating to equipment and supplies for the Ogden works. Most of the letters are to or from Walter S. Mallory, vice president. Other letters are to or from Emil Herter, draftsman, and Owen J. Conley, superintendent. Some of the letters concern machine shop work, changes to the elevator, and outfitting the bricking plant. T\vo letters by Edison pertain to his approval of a bid for work and his schedule at Sagamore Lake. Also included are correspondence with stockholder C. Livingston Rogers and a letter by Thomas A. Edison, Jr.

Correspondence (1897)

This folder contains documents, primarily correspondence, relating to activities at the Ogden works. Most of the letters are to or from Edison; Walter S. Malloiy, vice president; and Owen J. Conley, superintendent. The letters deal mainly with equipment, supplies, and insurance. The subjects addressed include the test of briquettes by the Crane Iron Works at Catasauqua, Pennsylvania; specifications for the construction of bricker furnaces and ovens; the purchase of special steam shovels; the sale of the Brennan crushers; and difficulties in obtaining credit from suppliers. Many of Mallory’s letters to Edison are reports on activities at the Ogden works. Other prominent correspondents include Col. John H. Wood, an insurance broker; Alexander Backus, president of the Vulcan Iron Works Company of Toledo, Ohio; Pilling & Crane of Philadelphia; and stockholder Robert L. Cutting III.

Correspondence (1898)

This folder contains documents, primarily correspondence, relating to activities, equipment, and improvements at the Ogden works. Most of the letters are from Fred R. Andress and Cal Freid, superintendents, to Edison concerning daily activities and improvements at the Ogden works. Some letters concern the quality of briquettes and the development of a market for Edison's crushing technology, including its promotion by Frank C. Roberts, civil engineer of Philadelphia, and its adoption by the New Jersey Zinc Co. of Franklin, New Jersey. There are several items in Edison’s hand relating to personnel matters, experiments, and lease negotiations. Included is a letter from Edison to Thomas Robins, Jr., president of the Robins Conveying Belt Co. in New York City, regarding the duplication of 36-inch rolls and Edison's intention "to design a whole line of milling machinery for sale." Other correspondents include geologist and mineralogist Henry C. Demming of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and metallurgist Robert H. Richards of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Correspondence (1899)

This folder contains documents, primarily correspondence, relating to the daily activities and improvements at the Ogden works. Most of the letters are from Cal Freid and R. H. Cunningham, superintendents, to Edison regarding the progress of work. Some letters concern the market for Edison’s crushing technology, including its use at the New Jersey Zinc Co. in Franklin, New Jersey. There is one undated letter in Edison’s hand instructing Walter S. Mallory, vice president, to take samples from ore tailings. Some items relate to briquettes, the quality of ore from the Ogden mines, and conditions in the iron market.

Correspondence (1900)

This folder contains correspondence relating to briquettes, the sale of Edison’s crushing technology, and Edison’s instructions regarding drawings and tracings. The correspondents include Walter S. Mallory, Pilling & Crane, and James B. Tonking, superintendent of the New Jersey Zinc Co.

Correspondence (1901)

This folder contains documents, primarily routine correspondence and memoranda, relating to company financial obligations. Only one item has been filmed: a letter to Walter S. Malloiy from W. P. Hardenburgh, vice president of the New Jersey Zinc Co., concerning a means to extend the life of elevator ropes.

Correspondence (1902)

This folder contains correspondence relating to ore analysis and a potential mill site in Ontario, Canada. Correspondence (1903)

This folder contains documents, primarily correspondence, relating to the Iona Island property deeded to Edison m 1892. One item is an mquny from Pilling & Crane regarding the speed of Edison’s 24-inch rolls. Another letter relates to the loan of a bricking machine to John W. Converse of the Baldwin Locomotive

Correspondence (1904)

This folder contains correspondence relating to the loan of a bricking machine to John W. Converse of the Baldwin Locomotive Works.

Correspondence (1905)

This folder contains correspondence, primarily from O.W. Miller, father-in-law of Walter S. Malloiy and manager of the Ogden works. Also included is a letter pertaining to a recommendation Edison made in 1894 urging the purchase of company stock.

Correspondence (1906)

This folder contains correspondence relating to the sale and transfer of equipment originally purchased for the Ogden works. Included are letters from Odgen employees and some letters concerning the analysis of ores and clav.

Correspondence (1907)

This folder contains correspondence relating to the cessation of all activities at the Ogden works. The letters pertain to the sale and removal of the remaining equipment, the destruction of company records, and Edison’s suggestions for selling the buildings.

Correspondence (1908)

This folder contains a list of material transferred from the Ogden works to the Edison Portland Cement Co. in Stewartsville, New Jersey. There is also a fist of material remaining at the Ogden works as of Januaiy 1908.

Correspondence (1909)

This folder contains a letter from C. B. Warner of New York City regarding the status of company stock, along with a reply by Walter S. Mallory announcing that the company had been placed in receivership.

Correspondence (1910)

This folder contains documents, primarily correspondence, relating to the company in receivership. Included are several letters regarding a claim against the company. One item pertains to the destruction of company records. Another item signed "Chas." is from Charles Edison. Prominent correspondents include Conover English of the Newark-based law firm of McCarter & English and Walter S. Mallory, president of the Edison Portland Cement Co.

Correspondence (1911)

This folder contains correspondence relating to company financial obligations, insurance, and legal matters. Stock Ledger (1888-1900)

TOs volume covers the period December 1888-January 1900. There are also some entries from January 1907. Thcbook contains a register of company stockholders. Also included is a partial list of increases in capital

Journal #2 (1889-1894)

This journal covers the period November 1889-May 1894. Its daily entries provide detailed information about transactions posted to various accounts, including payroll, plant construction, capital stock, and notes payable.

Journal #3 (1894-1900)

This journal covers the period June 1894-July 1900. Its daily entries provide detailed information about transactions posted to various accounts, including payroll, plant construction, capital stock, and notes payable.

Operating Cost Accounts (1892-1894)

This book covers the periods September-October 1892 and October 1894, with undated material probably dating from 1892 or 1894. The book contains investment accounts and statements of operating and repair costs. Included are investment accounts for September and October 1892; an enumerated statement of operating and repair costs for September and October 1892 followed by a detailed statement of costs for October 1892; a record of operating costs estimated by Edison in October 1894; an undated record of renewal and repair costs; and an undated record of supply costs. Related material can be found in Plant Operations

Correspondence (1889)

This folder contains correspondence relating to ore mining and milling operations at Bechtelsville, Pennsylvania, and Ogden, New Jersey. Most of the letters are to and from Edison and Harry M. Livor, general manager. The letters deal mainly with equipment, ore analyses, and mining properties. Some items concern the steam plant, separator, and crushing rolls. A few items pertain to the purchase of an expansion engine from Weyher & Richemond of France. Approximately 50 percent of the documents have been filmed.

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New Jersey and Pennsylvania Concentrating Works

OPERATORS UNDER THE "EDISON" SVSTEM FOR SEPARATING AND REFINING IRON ORES.

19 DEY STREET,

New York, October 8th U88

Thomas A. Edison, Esq.,

Edison1 Labaratory,

Orange, n.J.

My Dear Mr. Edison:

can leave Hew York, Pennsylvania Hoad, on Saturday afternoon at ,0 paet *», reaching Ogdenaourg at

S-S5, cM tea,. Ogdensburg Sunday afternoon at 4-m, reaching

*** * 7'10- *“* ',iu site m ample tlms at the Minea.

1 nopa nothing hill interfare »dth your going, ospooiaUy

°°la V*™***' if » aw to put up a m at the

Ogdon Kin.., »a mu,t aot prompUy to get th. foundationo i„ and der cover before the worst of the winter sets in.

Yours truly.

General Manager.

Thos. a. Edison.

SAM“««.I.rSULLT J- Hutchinson,

OFFICE OF

New Jersey and Pennsylvania Concentrating Works,

OPERATORS UNDER THE "EDISON" SYSTEM FOR SEPARATING AND REFINING IRON ORES.

19 DEY STREET,

x^Sl

V~

* OFFICE OF

New Jersey and Pennsylvania Concentrating Works,

OPERATORS UNDER THE PED1SON" SYSTEM FOR SEPARATING AND REFINING IRON ORES.

19' D'EY STREET,

October 2lst 1389

Thomas A, Edison.

Labor at ory, Orange , N. J.

I hand you herewith B, of L, of a barrel of Ore shipped

by -14r , Isaac McHose

us to experiment on.

This is_ the ore of which I spoke to you as being part magnetic, and

part non -magnetic. Vfill you please give instructions to have .your

'ives, so that it will not be overlook'

Yours truly.

OFFICE OF

New Jersey and Pennsylvania Concentrating Works,

19 DEY STREET,

New York, October 24th I a 89

While at tecl^elsyille yesterday I made some experiments i or the purpose of «n HtJtanfth* amount of iron in the tailings from the second magnet going to the waste heap, and just before leav- ' ins made the following analysis. As you will see the crude ore ran: unusually low. Crude ore contained II.28 metallic iron. The Con¬ centrate at the first market was 65.16, the tailings from the first , mariuct going to the second magnet was just exactly s%. The tailings from the second inagnet going to the waste heap war 2,77, The Con¬ centrate at the third magnet was 62.49, the tailings from the' third magnet were 6.70,

The parting board at the second magnet was set about s/a of an inch from the slit. The magnet was about f S A inches fr On the stream of ore. In putting the magnet any closer than this, in fact even at this distance from the stream, a groat deal of the ore ac¬ cumulate u on the face of the magnet, therefore I did not think it ad¬ visable to set the magnet any closer: still if V;c had 25 or 50* oi'e '

OFFICE OF

New Jersey and Pennsylvania Concentrating Works

OPERATORS UNDER THE "EDISON" SYSTEM FOR SEPARATING AND REFINING IRON ORES.

IE "EDISON" SYSTEM FOR SEPARATING AND REFINING IF

19 DEY STREET,

•s. A. Edison -2

- could obtain; the

New York,

ame result as ; above,

would be trifling as you will, admit yd Lx would- like to hear from you ' as to what you think, 6‘f these results.

The- .iune looks to me better than it has. at any time .yet . There is fnore^re-in sight than at any. 'tine' since kve/be gun- :6pU orations, and I have great hopes that within two or three weeks that , . we shall be & t ting out '/ 100 ; tons per day of ore that will average

considerably higher than the ore

3 now using. ifost of the ore

. wo arc now us ing is c oming , from over the tunnel, near the surface , 'and is, as you know, quite lean. I, think the ore in. the shafts will run up tc fully 2055 if not more. We have now got mined in the j shafts probably 500 or 600 tons of this ore which we expect to com¬ mence taking out in a few days. The mine at present is not in a §M condition for us to get at it economically. -I-

Thos. A. Edison.

Samuel Insull,

J. Hutchinson,

H. M. Livor,

OFFICE OF

New Jersey and Pennsylvania Concentrating Works,

OPERATORS UNDER THE "EDISON" SYSTEM FOR SEPARATING AND REFINING IRON ORES.

19 DEY STREET,

New York, October 24th 1939

Ifr. A. 0. Tate,

Edison1 s Laboratory,

Orange,' N.J.

Dear Sir:

I enclose herewith papers, in connection with the ^urc ha of the Benfield Iron Ore property which heed Mr. Edison's The letter from Messrs. Eaton « Lewis, also enclosed, explains what is desired of Mr. Edison. After the matter has been attended1 to please return all. the papers to me, including the letters of Eaton &

Samuel Insull,

J. Hutchinson, h. M. Livor,

OFFICE OF

OPERATORS UNDER THE "EDISON" SYSTEM FOR SEPARATING AND REFINING IRON

19 DEY STREET,

New York, 0ctobor 24th «bb

nsw Sir:

I enclose herewith the duplicate copy of the anreoaient between the Sussex, County iron Co. end the New Jersey a Pennsylvania Concent rat in" Works . : }T . Edison signe'd one of these Agreements the other day which is in possession of Mr. J. p. Brown, president of . . the Susses County Co. . Please have him sign this one and return the conyraet to me and I will obtain the Secretary* s signature and: Kaye the; seal attached, ;■

Please Rive this your immediate attention, as well as the matter pertaining to the Benfield purchase , about which i have writ-

G ue, 1 1 a'trr ,

_ :

J, Hutchinson,

OFFICE OF

New Jersey and Pennsylvania Concentrating Works,

OPERATORS UNDER THE "EDISON" SYSTEM FOR SEPARATING AND REFINING IRON ORES.

OFFICE OF

New Jersey and Pennsylvania Concentrating Works,

OPERATORS UNDER THE "EDISON" SYSTEM FOR SEPARATING AND REFINING IRON ORES,

[ENCLOSURE]

Translation.

Pant in 5th November, 1889.

Thomas A,: Edison,

Dear Sir:-

Wo have just received your telegram

as fo 11 o,v s : -

"Will take 300 h»* p, triplo expansion exposition engine with condenser. Await formal order toy mail. Havo you mailed phot o graphs ani bluo prints?"

We thank you very much for this order, and await instructions Tfliioh you promise by next mail. We are making at this monBnt special photographs for you, which wo will have the pleasure of sending you in a few days. Complete working drawings for the 150 and 300 h. p. engines, as well as the condensers, are nearly fini¬ shed and we think we shall be able to send them after a few days. The wooden models of the 150 h. p. engine are about to bo finished and those of the 300 h, p. engine are far advanced. We are losing no time in order to let you have then at the earliest possible mome:nt , Kindly send by first nail exact instructions for sEBsfes. shipping them from Havre to the United States . We thank you for allowing us to authorize a draft upon your Bankers, Drexel, Morjyin & Oo. through Drexel, Harjos & Co., of Paris, but we will not take, this liberty until after we shall have sent your models and dra¬ wings .

[ENCLOSURE]

In conclusion we shall state that \to shall be extremely happy if yew will favor us with a few words in your ovai handwriting that we may preserve as a souvenir.

( Signed) Oh, Vf e y h e r,

Mr. Thomas A. Edison, Orange, N.

Dear Sir;-

Nov. 23rd. 1889.

W1' ^

I am laying out the steam plantt for your1' Or# ivli 11 at Ogden.

I was up there yesterday with Mr. Livor. We need very much a general pis for foundation and general size of that 300 H. P. engine, and at Mr. Liyor's suggestion, I would ask you if you could not send the following cablegram to Weyher, Pantin, Seine. (I am not sure whether the name is quite right. )

also e ablest Le£eral enEine and foundation required,

wh?pVi°?+ o,n§in®.30an.nS??e“ to 165 revolutions, also direction in *

nection'caHe mlde^6 °f S3£K88kiHH enSine to whiSh direct shaft^oS-

I think it is necessary to get all this information at once by cablegram, as there are several questions depending upon it. The Ore plant is laid out to connect on direct shaft connection and they can¬ not get along very much with less than 165 revolutions.

Not being thoroughly familiar with the engine, X do not know whe¬ ther it can be adjusted up to that speed here. Also, we must know the direction of, revolution, or whether we can run it either way we want, otherwise it may change it from the side we have it on now to the other side. Please send me this information as soon as, you can get it.

I will try to get out there the first part of% next week, but I am hurrying these plans through for Mr. Livor and need.; all the information I can get as soon as possible.

The regular speed of the